Student Feature: Marcel Williams, Jr.

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Senior psychology major and English minor Marcel Williams, Jr. speaks highly of his Spalding education. As a student, he’s kept a busy schedule as vice president of the Student Government Association, vice president of Spalding Young Gifted and Black Scholars, an active member of CAB Campus Activities Board, and the list goes on.  Despite his busy schedule, Williams has also found the time to make plans for graduate school, studying applied behavior analysis—at Spalding, of course.

As a member of the Egan Service Living Program for the past two years, Williams has found the greatest satisfaction through a variety of community service projects, from working on houses of the elderly to organizing and participating in food drives and blood drives to working with churches to host art shows.

“Service to me is important because without it, nothing prospers,” says Williams. “I feel [that] if I take the initiative to serve someone then someone will take the initiative for me one day when I may really need it. I believe if you do good, good will come back to you. I had an internship with a well-known therapist name Dale Pyscher. He taught me the Hebrew phrase Tikkun olam, which means healing or repairing the world. It suggests humanity’s shared responsibility to heal, repair and transform the world. I genuinely believe that this is the purpose for human life.”

Williams also credits living on campus to his success as a student. The accessibility to campus resources such as the library, writing center and computer labs helped him academically, while events in the dorms, such as pie toss, barbeques, and water gun fights, allowed Williams to engage socially with his peers.

“I loved living on campus and being able to interact with colleagues and people who have the same goals as me,” says Williams.

For those interested in Spalding University, Williams says, “Do not to miss an opportunity of a life time.  There are many colleges and universities, but not one as prestigious and compassionate as Spalding.”

 

Read this article as it first appeared in Spalding Speaks newsletter.