The families of 13 children received life-changing pieces of assistive technology on Tuesday during another joyful Kosair Charities enTECH Day of Celebration at Spalding University.

Participating families of children who face cognitive challenges and physical differences applied for the devices through Spalding’s Kosair Charities Enabling Technologies of Kentuckiana (enTECH), assistive technology resource center and its Kosair Charities Lending Library and Financial Assistance Program.

There was no shortage of smiles as Kosair Charities President Keith Inman handed out the assistive technology devices to the children and their families, most of whom would not have been able to purchase the equipment on their own or through their health insurance.

The devices included Apple iPads and Pencils, an interactive printer, a swing, eye gaze applications, and switch toys. They will provide therapeutic, educational and sensory benefits and will help the children with communication, speech and play.

Keith Inman presents an assistive technology gift to an enTECH client
Keith Inman presents an assistive technology gift to a young enTECH client.

“Ninety-eight years ago, Kosair Charities was created for one reason, and that was to help children overcome  obstacles and reach their full potential,” Inman said. “I am loving the laughter I hear today, because this is what it is all about it. That is what happens here at enTECH. Miracles happen here. … I want to thank Spalding for all you do. It’s easy to love this place. This is the best day of my year.”

EnTECH, which is a division of Spalding’s Auerbach School of Occupational Therapy, has increased its therapy staff in recent months and now has speech therapists, occupational therapists and physical therapists ready to provide services and introduce young clients to the center’s array of assistive technology.

Learn more about enTECH’s services and staff at entech.spalding.edu.

“Having enTECH here at Spalding truly lives out our mission, and it allows us therapists to students from our (occupational therapy doctorate) program as well as the children that we serve thrive and meet the goals they have to engage in life to its fullest,” Auerbach School of Occupational Therapy Chair Dr. Sara Story said. “We’re excited for this Christmas in July opportunity and to have our therapists be able to come alongside these families and fulfill our mission.”

The Kosair Charities enTECH Day of Celebration was the latest memorable occasion in a 25-year philanthropic partnership between Kosair Charities and Spalding. Kosair Charities has supported a range of capital projects and academic programs and initiatives at Spalding that will positively impact children and pediatric healthcare.

Just last week, Kosair Charities announced a $2 million grant in support of the new Kosair Charities School of Physical Therapy and Center for Interprofessional Education at Spalding.

OT Chair Dr. Sara Story and the enTECH therapy staff
Spalding OT Chair Dr. Sara Story, left, and the enTECH therapy staff at the enTECH Day of Celebration.

 

 

 

Kosair Charities announced Wednesday that it has awarded a grant of $2 million to Spalding University in support of its new School of Physical Therapy and the ongoing project to transform a campus building into a state-of-the-art health professions academic center that will house the Doctor of Physical Therapy program. That building will now bear Kosair Charities’ name.

The 21,500-square-foot building located at 961 S. Third St. will be named the Kosair Charities School of Physical Therapy and Center for Interprofessional Education, Spalding announced. The technology-rich facility will be the site of the laboratory courses for Spalding’s new DPT program, which will admit its first cohort in Fall 2022. The building will also feature spaces for student study and collaboration.

The major grant, which was announced a press conference Wednesday, continues a 25-year philanthropic relationship between Kosair Charities and Spalding in support of academic programs and facilities – particularly in healthcare – that are designed to make a positive impact on the lives of children and families.

Consistent with the mission of Kosair Charities, the School of Physical Therapy will feature programming and partnerships that emphasize a commitment to pediatric physical therapy while seeking to help fill a regional need for physical therapists. Among the highlights:

  • Planned post-professional residency and fellowship in pediatric PT that are unique to Kentucky, led by faculty who are board-certified in pediatric physical therapy.
  • Mentoring opportunities in teaching, provided by veteran faculty, for interested physical therapists, including ones in post-doctoral pediatric neurorecovery fellowships.
  • Opportunities for physical therapy program graduates to become board-certified pediatric physical therapists.

“Kosair Charities’ history and mission has long been interwoven into the fabric of Spalding University, with our first grant in 1996. We are thrilled to announce a grant totaling $2 million to support the newly named Kosair Charities School of Physical Therapy and Center for Interprofessional Education at Spalding University,” said Keith Inman, President of Kosair Charities. “A portion of these funds will allow the creation of Kentucky’s first residency and fellowship programs in pediatric physical therapy. Kosair Charities is proud to be a part of this milestone moment for our state and community.”

KOSAIR CHARITIES SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL THERAPY
Doctor of Physical Therapy Program | Overview | Entry-level track | Post-professional track
From May 2021 | Announcement of the new School of Physical Therapy 

Spalding’s DPT program has already been approved by the university’s regional accrediting body – the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) – and is seeking to become the fourth DPT program in Kentucky to be accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE). Student applications are open now for Fall 2022, with more information available at spalding.edu/physicaltherapy.

Construction on the Kosair Charities School of Physical Therapy and Center for Interprofessional Education is scheduled to be completed by late 2021.

Rendering of the facade of the Kosair Charities School of Physical Therapy and Center for Interprofessional Education at Spalding University
Rendering of the facade of the Kosair Charities School of Physical Therapy and Center for Interprofessional Education at Spalding University, 961 S. Third St.

“We are grateful and honored to receive this grant from Kosair Charities in support of the new School of Physical Therapy and the construction of a state-of-the-art building that will enhance teaching and learning while also supporting a campus-wide culture of interprofessional education and collaboration,” Spalding President Tori Murden McClure said. “The service-minded missions of Spalding and Kosair Charities align so well, and the long, strong relationship Spalding has had with Kosair Charities is so valuable to us. We are extremely proud to have another building on our campus bear the name of Kosair Charities, whose impact on our community and the lives of children cannot be overstated.

“We hope and expect that a great deal of the students who come to our PT school will stay in Louisville after graduation to practice here, including many who will pursue a pediatric specialty. Our new PT school will also create mentoring opportunities for pediatric PTs to become professors, enhancing pediatric PT education in our region for years to come.”

BUILDING DETAILS

The purchase and renovation of the building – which was acquired by Spalding in 2019 and is well-known in Louisville as the former longtime home of the V.V. Cooke Chevrolet dealership – represent one of the largest capital projects in Spalding history, totaling about $7 million. The newly renovated building expands a Spalding health professions corridor along South Third Street that already includes the Kosair Charities College of Health and Natural Sciences Building, 901 S. Third (home of the occupational therapy, athletic training and natural sciences programs), and the Republic Bank Academic Center, 981 S. Third (nursing and social work).

The building will feature three skills labs for on-site laboratory instruction as well as an anatomy education center with an anatomy wet lab and accompanying dry lab featuring models and technology for virtual anatomy instruction.

Rendering of the interior of the Kosair Charities School of Physical Therapy and Center for Interprofessional Education at Spalding University
Rendering of an interior of the Kosair Charities School of Physical Therapy and Center for Interprofessional Education at Spalding University, 961 S. Third St.

An atrium with natural light coming through the tall windows along Third Street will provide collaborative and lounge space for students. Another student lounge will be upstairs.

Schaefer Construction is the general contractor for the project. Schmidt Associates is the architecture partner. Spalding continues to raises funds to cover capital costs.

“We cannot thank Kosair Charities enough for their support of this first-class healthcare academic center in downtown Louisville,” Spalding Chief Advancement Officer Caroline Heine said. “Kosair Charities continues to help Spalding carry out its mission of meeting the needs of the times by preparing compassionate, skilled therapists and healthcare professionals, and we hope others will follow their lead in supporting this important work.”

CENTER FOR INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

The location of the building between other health science centers on campus, along with its technology resources, makes it an ideal location to be the future center of Spalding’s initiative to expand interprofessional education (IPE) across its academic healthcare disciplines.

The new anatomy labs are expected to be used by students and faculty from science programs across the university, and Spalding expects to use the new building to host collaborative IPE student experiential learning activities.

“In real healthcare settings, physical therapists, occupational therapists, nurses, social workers and mental health professionals work side by side every day,” McClure said. “At Spalding, we are committed to introducing our students to those interprofessional experiences as a part of our teaching, with a common thread of emphasizing compassion, equity and justice in healthcare.”

Rendering of atrium of Spalding School of Physical Therapy building
An atrium will offer student collaborative and study spaces and lots of natural light along Third Street in the School of Physical Therapy Building. / All renderings courtesy of Schmidt Associates

During a moment in which the deaths of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd and others have renewed and heightened the focus on racism in America, a specialty clinic at Spalding University’s Center for Behavioral Health has served a unique role in raising awareness and providing therapy for victims of race-based stress and trauma.

The Collective Care Center, which is a division of the comprehensive Center of Behavioral Health psychological services and training clinic, is the only mental health clinic in Louisville – and one of only a few nationally – that specializes in racial trauma.

Over the past several months, in the wake of the killings of Taylor and Floyd, the Collective Care Center has offered free telehealth services to dozens of clients during the pandemic, helping them process and cope with the racial trauma they’ve experienced throughout their lives.

The clinic fills a need in a country in which 96 percent of Black citizens report daily experiences of racism and discrimination, said Spalding Chief Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Officer  Dr. Steven Kniffley, who leads the Collective Care Center while also serving on the faculty of the School of Professional Psychology.

“We do the work that we do because we recognize that there’s this unique form of trauma that Black and Brown folks are experiencing that can’t be explained away by (more commonly discussed forms of) physical trauma or emotional trauma,” Kniffley said. “And we recognize that the earlier that we can intervene, the better support that we can provide.”

MORE | Center for Behavioral Health | Collective Care Center 

Kniffley is a frequent public speaker who leads talks and seminars explaining racial trauma, estimating that he’s given more than 100 community presentations since March. Since June, about 400 clinicians, including ones in Africa, England and the Caribbean, have participated in training workshops developed by Kniffley on racial trauma and therapy.

Kniffley said socioeconomic status and educational status do not provide buffers against the experience of race-based stress, noting that in Louisville, Blacks have about the same life expectancy regardless of if they live in the West End or East End.

People experiencing race-based stress may include those who have been direct victims of discrimination, targets of racial slurs or witnesses to a traumatic event. People can also be vicariously traumatized by seeing disturbing images and news accounts of traumatic events involving race.

“We would ask, ‘When was the last time you experienced a racially traumatic event?’” Kniffley said. “‘How distressing was that to you? In what ways is that distress showing up for you? Are you having a hard time sleeping? Are you feeling anxious … around your surroundings?’”

MORE | Spalding PsyD Program Overview | Psychology Faculty Bios

He said race-based stress is nothing new, but only in recent years has it been more formally recognized as a potentially serious physical and psychological health factor that may require professional help.

“From a public health standpoint, racism can literally kill you,” Kniffley said, “because it can contribute to depression, anxiety, and it can also lead to high blood pressure, diabetes, low birth weight.”

RELATED | Kniffley named Chief Justice, Equity, Diversity, Inclusion Officer
RELATED | PsyD student selected for prestigious APA Minority Fellowship 

The Collective Care Center is able to offer free therapy services through the support of community partners. In one such partnership, Heine Brothers’ Coffee recently donated $1,212 to the Collective Care Center as one of its 2020 Social Impact Partners. For several months, Heine Brothers’  contributed $1 of every bag sold of its Mountain Dream coffee to the CCC.

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Overall growth at Center for Behavioral Health

The increased impact of the Collective Care Center has coincided with the overall growth of the Center for Behavioral Health (CBH), which serves as a training clinic for many students in Spalding’s Doctor of Clinical Psychology (PsyD) program.

The CBH offers a range of mental health services to the public at an affordable rate, using a sliding scale based on income and home size. The clinic offers psychological assessments and individual, couple, group and family therapy services with children, adolescents, adults and older adults.

Over the past two years, visits to the CBH have more than quadrupled, now averaging about 115 per week, according to Dr. Norah Chapman, Director of the CBH and Associate Chair of the School of Professional Psychology.

The CBH, located in Spalding’s Mansion East complex at 851 S. Fourth St., continues to offer in-person assessments while conducting therapy sessions exclusively via telehealth during the pandemic.

“I think now, more than ever, people are isolated and anxious in the uncertainty of our times,” Chapman said. “Receiving mental health care and just having somebody to (help people) feel less alone or maybe validated in the experiences that they are going through is crucial.”

Chapman said the CBH is developing a specialty clinic for women and families dealing with the emotional toll of infertility, pregnancy loss and other postpartum issues. One in four women have experienced pregnancy loss, and it can be exacerbated for women of color, she said.

“Fertility counseling and post-partum counseling are not widely talked about in our field,” Chapman said, “and it’s not readily accessible to a lot of folks because of cost. It’s very expensive to go through that process. These experiences can be really painful for a lot of people, and especially if that care is not available to them, the psychological ramifications of that are paramount.”

Chapman said the CBH has probably become the largest PsyD practicum site in the city, with students gaining the experience of working with clients while under the supervision of Spalding faculty members who are licensed clinical psychologists, such as herself and Kniffley.

“I have tremendous pride that Spalding University is behind the CBH and the CCC in our dual mission of training doctoral students and working with underserved communities, including ensuring that racial trauma treatment and healing are offered in our community,” Chapman said.

“We’re doing something novel to really meet the needs of the times and to really help to facilitate access to quality behavioral health care while also making sure that our students are getting training before they go off independently to create their own ripples in the world.”

For more information on the Collective Care Center or any services offered at the Center for Behavioral Health, call (502) 792-7011 or visit behavioralhealth.spalding.edu.

On Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020, Spalding University and Kosair Charities announced the 2021 cohort of the Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute – an innovative yearlong professional development and executive coaching program at Spalding for nonprofit leaders. Learn more about the 20 nonprofit leaders in the upcoming class below:

STACY BAILEY-NDIAYE, Executive Director, Bridge Kids International

About the organization: Bridge Kids International uses the power of African heritage culture to create communities that support the well-being of young people.  We help young people develop their own solutions to community challenges and build positive relationships between African, African-American, Caribbean and other African Diaspora groups for the purposes of friendship, cooperation, and individual and community empowerment.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I was honored to be asked to participate in LDI.  I am excited to build my capacity to lead from my strengths, develop a strong and balanced team, and incorporate sound business strategies to grow my organization.”

KARINA BARILLAS, Executive Director, La Casita Center

About the organization: La Casita Center is a community of Latinx Hospitality. We are a grassroots nonprofit located in Louisville, accompanying families in the Latinx community.  Our mission is to empower these families, providing a foundation for systemic change with long-term effects.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I am honored to have been invited to participate and to be part of the KCLDI.  I am looking forward to acquiring new knowledge, participating and strategizing the steps for La Casita to go to the next level.  I am also very excited to meet amazing nonprofit people in my cohort, and learn from them as well.”

**NEWS RELEASE | Announcing the Spalding’s 2021 Kosair Charities LDI class

KAITLIN BLESSIT, Executive Director, Marty’s Orchid House

About the organization: Marty’s Orchid House is a therapeutic and health-focused day center for preschoolers with autism, sensory processing disorders and overlapping health conditions. We offer all day services for working parents of high-risk children, including skilled pediatric nursing care, adapted curriculum, therapeutic services and nutritional support.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “What an honor to be chosen for the Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute! I am thrilled to have the opportunity to learn from the best of the best. I look forward to learning about my own leadership style analysis so I can maximize my strengths strategically and become aware of areas needing more strength and balance to boost my organization to excellence. We all have the ability and great responsibility to continuously develop ourselves professionally to support our organizational mission and vision. In order to best serve our community, we must first begin with ourselves.”

MARLAND COLE, Executive Director, Evolve502

About the organization: Evolve502 is a public-private partnership working to ensure that every child in Louisville is prepared for college, a career and a successful, productive life.  Evolve502 does this work by convening and organizing community partners to better link youth to resources to ensure academic success and by providing access and funding to pursue a postsecondary education, beginning with the Jefferson County Public Schools class of 2021. Focusing on systems, scholarships and supports, Evolve502 is committed to removing and mitigating the systemic barriers of poverty and racism, and to ensure an educated, growing and vibrant community where all citizens can prosper.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I am honored to be selected as a Kosair Charities LDI participant. I am looking forward to gaining new tools and perspectives that will enable me to grow in my leadership role. I also appreciate the opportunity to build a network of relationships with other nonprofit thought leaders who share similar experiences and challenges.”

MEGAN COOPER, Executive Director, Camp Hendon

About the organization: Camp Hendon supports children with Type 1 Diabetes and their families through summer camp, weekend retreats and other year-round events. We empower our campers and their families by providing the tools, guidance and camaraderie they need to take control of their journey with diabetes.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I am really honored and excited to be a part of the Kosair Charities LDI at Spalding. As a young professional with only a few years of nonprofit experience under my belt, I am looking forward to honing my leadership skills, gaining greater confidence in myself as a leader, and tapping into all of this for the benefit of Camp Hendon.”

ARTHUR COX, Executive Director, St. George’s Scholar Institute

About the organization: The St. George’s Scholar Institute (SGSI) is a youth development agency that provides quality, out-of-school programming for social, emotional and academic learning to vulnerable youth in the California neighborhood and surrounding neighborhoods. Our mission is to Embrace, Educate and Empower youth in Louisville.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I was honored to know that I was selected to take part in the Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute. The distinction came at a pivotal time in my career. I look forward to learning about myself, my assets and deficiencies and how I can best lead the team I’m a part of.”

JENNIE JEAN DAVIDSON, Executive Director, Neighborhood House

About the organization: Neighborhood House is a whole-family community center serving the neighborhoods of Louisville’s West End. We serve families from the twinkle to the wrinkle! That includes a world-class child development center, a robust youth program (currently providing all-day NTI support to four classrooms of Jefferson County Public Schools students), a family engagement and family coaching program, a senior program (which is safely virtual during the pandemic), and an emergency food bank.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I am excited to bring new tools to Neighborhood House to help us increase our impact and our ability to ensure that families are better off as we enter our 125th year serving kids and families in Louisville.”

EMILIE DYER, Program Director, Americana World Community Center

About the organization: Americana World Community Center is bridging the gap from surviving to thriving for Louisville’s refugee, immigrant and underserved populations through education, family support, youth achievement, and career and financial development.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I am excited to be part of the unique professional learning opportunity provided by the Kosair Charities LDI. I believe this training will allow me to further develop my professional network and build my finance and advancement skills for nonprofit management.”

EDWIN FOX, Tutoring Program Coordinator, First Gethsemane Center for Family Development

About the organization: First Gethsemane Center for Family Development Inc. has provided our youth with several Out-of-School-Time Academic Enhancement Programs, which include summer enrichment camps, free spring/fall after-school tutoring, robotics workshops and Saturday ACT prep workshops. We focus on improving reading comprehension, mathematics and writing skills for the youth.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I was very excited to be selected for the Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute. This is an opportunity to learn how to enhance and improve the daily operation of our organization in providing life-changing academic support to youth in our community.”

TANISHA “TISH” FREDERICK, Founder, BAYA (Beautiful As You Are)

About the organization: The BAYA (Beautiful As You Are) program provides self-esteem building services for girls ages 6-18.  We serve as an after-school program for some JCPS schools, Boys and Girls Club and the Cabbage Patch Settlement House, to name a few.  The “BAYA Center,” located in Clarksville, Indiana, provides weekly interactive self-esteem building workshops and activities to girls and their families at little to no cost.  Our overall goal is to teach girls to cope with stress in a positive way and to love themselves unconditionally.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “My initial reaction was shock and excitement! I couldn’t believe I was chosen to be in a class with so many excellent nonprofit leaders. I am looking forward to growing as a leader, stretching myself mentally and being challenged by the curriculum in this program.  I have high expectations that when I graduate from this program I will be in a better position to take our organization to the next level and truly build sustainability as a nonprofit.”

SONJA GREY, Executive Director, ECHO (Exploited Children’s Health Organization)

About the organization: For over 30 years, ECHO’s mission has been dedicated to preventing and reducing the incidences and impact of child abuse by providing education, advocacy and support services to the children and families of Metro Louisville. ECHO provides comprehensive and evidence-based prevention education. Our program provides educational information about child abuse prevention and is targeted for children and youth, youth-serving organizations and concerned adults. The program helps to empower the voices of children and seeks to create a stronger and safer community for all.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “My reaction to being selected for this program was pure excitement! I am honored to have been selected to participate with such an elite group of community leaders. I am most looking forward to cultivating new relationships with my classmates, learning new tools or skills from experts, and ways to engage with each other. With this experience, I want to continue to learn about myself and how I can be the most effective, compassionate leader for ECHO and the community.”

SARAH HALFACRE, Executive Director, Green Hill Therapy

About the organization: Green Hill Therapy’s mission is to help children reach their full potential through proven playful intervention. We accomplish this by providing highly specialized and individualized Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy services.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “The Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute at Spalding makes me extremely hopeful for the future as it sets all of our organizations up for success. I am eager to further develop and implement the essential skills of leadership so that I can best position Green Hill Therapy to help children in our community. This is an extraordinary opportunity that promotes networking and cooperation between nonprofits in our area.”

JOE MCCOMBS, Director of Operations, enTECH at Spalding University

About the organization: Kosair Charities Enabling Technologies of Kentuckiana – or enTECH – is one of five assistive technology resource centers (ATRC) in the state that receive funding from the Kentucky Assistive Technology Network (KATS) to assist those in need of durable medical equipment and communication devices that enhance the quality of life for individuals across the lifespan. A division of Spalding University’s Auerbach School of Occupational Therapy, enTECH also partners with Kosair Charities to support medically fragile children and others to overcome barriers with mobility and communication.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “It is an honor and a privilege to be a part of the Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute, and I am extremely thankful for the opportunity to be included in this cohort. I look forward to collaborating with my colleagues and to learning more about the how’s and why’s that make their organizations successful.”

KATHY MULLEN, Director of Education, VIPS Louisville

About the organization: Visually Impaired Preschool Services (VIPS) providers early intervention services and educational consultation for children who are blind or visually impaired. We are statewide providers across Kentucky and Indiana. In Kentucky, we serve children aged birth to 5 years, and in Indiana, we serve children aged birth to 3. We serve children in their homes and the community, coaching parents on how to fully include their child in their family life and to prepare them for their next educational setting. We have offices in Louisville (headquarters); Lexington, Kentucky; and Indianapolis. Our Louisville campus is home to VIPS Kids Town Preschool, of which Kosair Charities is a major supporter.  Kids Town Preschool is recognized internationally as a premier center for educating young children who are blind or visually impaired.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I humbly acknowledge that others recognize me as a leader in the field of early intervention. Participating in LDI will help me confirm that recognition comes from my leadership skills and experience and not my age. As a lifelong learner, I am truly honored and extremely excited about being selected for the second LDI class. Very grateful, too!”

CHRISTINA POOLE, Founder/President, City Schoolhouse

About the organization: We are a private neighborhood school serving children ages 6 months to 12 years where ability to pay does not infringe on a family’s access to attend our school. There are three main factors that distinguish City Schoolhouse from other schools. First, we educate the whole child with an individualized learning plan. Second, we use a two-generation approach to education. Third, our schoolhouse model is intentionally designed to be close to the people it serves.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I was honored to be selected to participate in the LDI at Spalding! I believe it is a great opportunity to connect with other nonprofits and leaders in the community. I look forward to developing more leadership skills to carry our organization’s mission far and wide and for many years to come!”

KISH CUMI PRICE, Director of Education Policy and Programming, Louisville Urban League

About the organization: The Louisville Urban League is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, community service organization dedicated to eliminating racism and its adverse impacts on our community

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I am excited to be in great company with some of the city’s most impactful leaders as we prepare to learn from each other and benefit from the personal and professional development opportunities offered by the Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute at Spalding.”

KATHERINE SIX, Executive Director, Educational Justice

About the organization: Educational Justice strives to end educational inequity by pairing a fifth- to eighth-grade student with a high-achieving high school student for long-term academic mentorship aimed at both improving academic performance and providing a meaningful student leadership experience.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “My honest first reaction to being selected for the Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute at Spalding was honor and excitement, quickly followed by reservation of not knowing if I would have the time to dedicate to the institute in this particularly challenging season due to COVID-19. However, after the first meeting with the program directors and other participants, I knew this was the exact time to participate in this opportunity. Now more than ever as a young leader, I need the lessons in leadership and communication that this institute will provide so that I can better support the rest of the Educational Justice staff who are working tirelessly to provide students throughout Louisville with the academic assistance they deserve.”

DAVID WEATHERSBY, Chief Operating Officer, Seven Counties Services

About the organization: Seven Counties Services is a community mental health center and provides behavioral health services to the people of the seven counties region surrounding Louisville.  We serve people with issues related to mental health, addictions, and intellectual and developmental challenges.  Our mission is to help people find and reach their potential.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I am grateful and excited to have this opportunity and look forward to learning all about strengths-based and possibility-driven leadership.”

PATRICIA WILLIAMS, President and CEO, Wesley House Community Services

About the organization: Wesley House Community Services is a cornerstone nonprofit 501(c)(3) institution serving Louisville Metro and surrounding areas for more than 117 years. Our programs include early child development, Out-of-School Time services for youth and economic empowerment resources for adults. We provide direct services to our communities’ most marginalized and economically vulnerable populations.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I am delighted to be a part of the 2021 KCLD cohort. I look forward to accessing knowledge about my leadership style that will allow me to leverage it as a resource to drive our agency’s mission forward. I’m super excited to share this opportunity with a table of phenomenal leaders.”

LORI WILSON, Executive Director, Carriage House Educational Services

About the organization: Carriage House Educational Services provides inclusive preschool and early intervention ABA group services to children ages 2-6 years. We also provide home- and community-based behavior intervention services through the Michelle P. Waiver.

On being part of the Kosair Charities LDI: “I was honored to be selected to participate in Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute at Spalding University. I am looking forward to enhancing my leadership skills and applying what I learned to our organization.”

Kosair Charities and Spalding University announced Tuesday the 20 individuals who will make up the 2021 cohort of the Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute, a yearlong interactive program at Spalding for leaders of area nonprofit organizations. The institute, which is in its second year, aims to improve and enhance already high-performing nonprofits that are dedicated to supporting children and families.

The second class of the Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute (LDI) includes executive directors and senior leaders from a range of nonprofit organizations, with some of them among the more than 80 organizations that have received philanthropic support from Kosair Charities. Spalding’s Kosair Charities Leadership Development Institute is believed to be a one-of-a-kind partnership in the region between a university and a philanthropic organization to provide broad professional development to leaders in the social impact sector.

Beginning in January, the new Kosair Charities LDI cohort will collaborate with others during a year of professional development and executive coaching from an array of Spalding faculty, staff and community partners in all facets of organizational development and leadership.

RELATED | Kosair Charities and enTECH Virtual Day of Celebration brings joy

“We are excited to continue our unique partnership with Spalding University for a second year in order to equip even more of our area’s most outstanding nonprofit leaders with evidence-based tools and valuable skills that will help sustain and advance their organizations, whose services and advocacy are vital to our community’s well-being,” Kosair Charities President Keith Inman said.

“By the end of 2021, more than three dozen organizations will have leaders who have completed this high-level professional development and coaching from Spalding’s expert faculty and staff. This LDI class is a diverse, dynamic group of leaders who are providing a range of educational, health care, cultural and support services that will help children and families reach their full potential. The institute will help them learn how to perform their important work at a higher level.”

The group will primarily meet virtually for the duration of the pandemic, participating in workshops, projects and executive coaching by nationally certified coaches, covering concepts similar to those of a graduate-level academic program. Topics will include emotional intelligence leadership, financial and strategic management, fundraising, marketing and public relations, organizational culture and team-building, and ethical leadership. Throughout the course, the curriculum will weave in social justice concepts.

“I am honored to be selected as a Kosair Charities LDI participant,” said Marland Cole, one of the new cohort members who serves as Executive Director of Evolve502. “I am looking forward to gaining new tools and perspectives that will enable me to grow in my leadership role. I also appreciate the opportunity to build a network of relationships with other nonprofit thought leaders who share similar experiences and challenges.”

Nearly 20 Spalding faculty, staff and community partners, including Spalding President Tori Murden McClure and Kosair Charities’ Inman, will serve as workshop presenters and coaches for the LDI.

Dr. Joanne Berryman, who retired in 2019 as Spalding’s Provost and is a former Senior Vice President for Jewish Hospital and a former CEO of Frazier Rehab Institute, serves as the university’s Kosair Charities LDI Program Director. Berryman is also a certified Gallup Strengths-Based Leadership Coach and is certified by Multi-Health Systems and Genos Inc. as an Emotional Intelligence Coach.

“Spalding University is proud to partner with Kosair Charities to continue providing this high-level training to nonprofit leaders who are doing some of the most meaningful work in our community, and our involvement aligns perfectly with the Spalding mission,” McClure said. “As a small, compassionate university dedicated to peace, justice and service – and as a nonprofit organization, itself, made up of experienced nonprofit leaders – Spalding is well-suited to deliver this type of comprehensive training and coaching. We can’t wait to get started with the second cohort!”

SPALDING’S KOSAIR CHARITIES LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE 2021 COHORT ROSTER

  • Stacy Bailey-Ndiaye, Executive Director, Bridge Kids International
  • Karina Barillas, Executive Director, La Casita Center
  • Kaitlin Blessitt, Executive Director, Marty’s Orchid House
  • Marland Cole, Executive Director, Evolve502
  • Megan Cooper, Executive Director, Camp Hendon
  • Arthur Cox, Executive Director, St. George’s Scholar Institute
  • Jennie Jean Davidson, Executive Director, Neighborhood House
  • Emilie Dyer, Program Director, Americana World Community Center
  • Edwin Fox, Tutoring Program Coordinator, First Gethsemane Center for Family Development
  • Tanisha “Tish” Frederick, Founder, BAYA
  • Sonja Grey, Executive Director, ECHO
  • Sarah Halfacre, Executive Director, Green Hill Therapy
  • Joe McCombs, Director of Operations, enTECH at Spalding Univ.
  • Kathy Mullen, Director of Education, VIPS Louisville
  • Christina Poole, Founder/President, City Schoolhouse
  • Kish Cumi Price, Director of Education Policy and Programming, Louisville Urban League
  • Katherine Six, Executive Director, Educational Justice
  • David Weathersby, Chief Operating Officer, Seven Counties Services
  • Patricia Williams, President and CEO, Wesley House Community Services
  • Lori Wilson, Executive Director, Carriage House Educational Services

The pandemic may have forced it to take place over a video conference instead of in person, but the physical distance didn’t prevent Thursday’s Kosair Charities and enTECH Virtual Day of Celebration from living up to its name in the joyful, celebratory spirit of the holiday season.

Leaders from Spalding University and Kosair Charities joined the online call to meet the families that are receiving gifts of assistive technology for their children who face physical challenges and cognitive differences.

The gifts, to be distributed in the coming weeks through enTECH and its Kosair Charities Financial Assistance Program, will provide the children with therapeutic, educational and sensory benefits and help them with communication, speech, mobility and play.


enTECH Overview| Visit home page of the assistive technology resource center


The gifts included Apple iPads with the latest assistive-technology apps and accessories, switch toys, floatation devices that help with bathing, and communication and writing tools. The devices and apps are often not covered by insurance and can very expensive if purchased out of pocket.

Brittany Farris was thankful that her 23-month-old daughter, Leah, would being receiving a series of specialized switch toys to help her play.

“Most toys that are typical for a child her age, she just cannot play with,” Brittany Farris said. “It’s been one of those things where we’re like, ‘How can we get her switch toys?’ Insurance does not want to pay for play things for children sometimes. So it’s been quite difficult to get some of these items, and we’re just truly so appreciative of each and every item. And I promise we will utilize them and really appreciate what you guys are doing.”

Shamenda Harper Livingston said her sixth-grade son Kinjay would benefit from the LAMP Words for Life communications app he’d be receiving, adding that he has been thriving as an honor-roll student at Johnson Traditional Middle School. Additionally, Kinjay’s new Apple Pencil “will really help him make his letters and writing a little better and more legible,” his mom said.

The Kosair Charities Enabling Technologies of Kentuckiana assistive technology resource center – or enTECH, for short – is a division of Spalding’s Auerbach School of Occupational Therapy and is located on Spalding’s campus at 812 S. Second St. in the former Kosair Shrine Temple. It is one of five state-designated assistive technology resource centers in Kentucky, and it offers a range of therapy services. Kosair Charities is a major supporter of its programs and facilities.

“This partnership with Spalding is so important because Spalding is not afraid to think big and bold, and that’s what we need in this world: big and bold thinking,” Kosair Charities President Keith Inman said. “So this is going to be a partnership that’s going to last a long, long time.

“… We’re just honored that we we have the ability to do the little piece that we can do because what you do at Spalding and enTECH, top to bottom, that’s hard work. For 97 years, we have had one goal, and that’s to help children overcome some significant obstacles to reach their full potential. And nowhere is this more evident than on this call.”

Spalding President Tori Murden McClure said that in a year in which the pandemic had limited the joy of so much, Thursday’s virtual celebration with Kosair Charities and enTECH was a return to fun.

“This event (is an occasion in which) we give really important technology and mobility tools to the young ones in a setting where you’re just thrilled to see them, and see the families and the joy and the relief and the fun,” McClure said. “And so I just want to, say, I really love our Kosair Charities partners, and I love enTECH.”

Watch the video of the full Kosair Charities and enTECH Day of Celebration below:

As the country celebrates the leadership and influence of school principals during National Principals Month in October, graduate students in Spalding University’s new principal preparation partnership program with Jefferson County Public Schools said they are receiving valuable training on how to manage real issues facing principals in Louisville schools.

The inaugural 19-member cohort of Spalding’s JCPS Aspiring Leaders Principal Certification Program recently spread out in the Dunn Elementary School cafeteria for a socially distant, masked-up class titled Leading Teaching and Learning, taught by Dunn Principal Dr. Tracy Barber. Guest speakers explaining JCPS diversity and equity policy Zoomed in on a projector screen as the students – who are all JCPS teachers and employees, themselves – took notes and asked questions.

It was a session that typified the Aspiring Leaders experience – with an actual JCPS principal and actual JCPS administrators and staff leading dialogue and teaching curriculum designed specifically for future JCPS principals.

Aspiring Leaders student Mario Ransan, a social studies teacher at the Phoenix School of Discovery, said he became interested in the Spalding program upon hearing “who you’re learning from and the sheer amount of experience that they have.”

To that point, Ransan said, the very first meeting of one of his classes included an hour-long guest lecture from JCPS Superintendent Dr. Marty Pollio.

“That was Day 1, and that was huge,” Ransan said. “Every other class has been just like that. We meet everybody that we’ll need to know for the district. Plus other principals and vice principals. It’s just invaluable. This is legit. To be able to sit down with real principals and ask real questions and get real answers has been huge.”

Ransan said he has enjoyed learning from Barber, who routinely shares real issues she’s dealt with and explains how she handled them.

“The reality is that schools must change fundamentally,” said Barber, who earned her Doctorate of Education (EdD) in Leadership from Spalding. “Before we can redesign schools, we must redesign the programs that prepare school leaders. Tapping potential leaders in JCPS with demonstrated knowledge of curriculum and instruction and then planning quality school leadership growth opportunities is what Spalding University has developed in the Aspiring Leaders program.  This diverse group of future school leaders are engaged in the critical work of acquiring skills needed to build higher performing, equitable schools for our community.”

Graduates from the yearlong program will earn the degree of Master of Education in Instructional Leadership: Principal Preparation, and be positioned for a Level I Kentucky Principal Certification and, depending on the individual’s previous education, either a Rank I or Rank II Kentucky Teacher Certification.

The hybrid online/in-person program within Spalding’s College of Education is directed by Assistant Professor Dr. Glenn Baete, a retired JCPS assistant superintendent and former principal at Doss High School.

Ransan, who also earned his master’s in teaching from Spalding, said that Baete has been accessible via texts and calls whenever he’s needed him with questions about assignments. Another Aspiring Leaders student, Torri Martin, who teaches eighth-grade math at the J. Graham Brown School, said Baete is understanding and flexible about the demands the cohort members face as working professionals.

“They have made it very, very easy for a working adult to get a graduate-level degree,” she said.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION OVERVIEW | All Spalding bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs 

Martin said the collaboration between Spalding and JCPS to design a program that is tailored to the needs of the local school system is “very, very special.”

Learning about “the reality of what it’s like day to day in the schools has been invaluable,” Martin said. “Hearing from Dr. Barber about what she would do in certain situations and her vast experience, I couldn’t get that anywhere else.”

The 30-credit hour Aspiring Leaders program is open to JCPS employees with a Kentucky teaching certificate and at least three years of teaching experience and a bachelor’s or master’s degree with a 2.75 GPA.

The Spalding master’s curriculum is unique in that it has been tailored directly for the JCPS system and will be presented through the lens of JCPS’ three institutional pillars – a Backpack of Success Skills, Racial Equity, and Climate and Culture.

Pollio and Spalding President Tori Murden McClure held a news conference in March to announce the Aspiring Leaders program, just before the pandemic.

The first cohort began meeting virtually in July and has held weekly in-person meetings this fall.

For more information, contact Dr. Baete at gbaete@spalding.edu.

Watch a video from the March introductory news conference

The Spalding University College of Education and Jefferson County Public Schools have announced a partnership on a new graduate academic program at Spalding that is designed specifically to prepare JCPS employees to become principals, helping bolster the principal pipeline in the school district.

The yearlong Aspiring Leaders Principal Certification Program will launch this summer with its first cohort of JCPS employees pursuing Spalding’s Master of Education in Instructional Leadership: Principal Preparation.

The 30-credit-hour program is unique in that master’s curriculum has been tailored directly for the JCPS system and will be presented through the lens of JCPS’ three institutional pillars – a Backpack of Success Skills, Racial Equity, and Climate and Culture. Current and former JCPS principals and administrators will serve as Spalding’s instructors in the program. The partnership was formally approved by the Jefferson County Board of Education.

“We are building a pipeline for the next generation of school leaders,” JCPS Superintendent Dr. Marty Pollio said. “We appreciate Spalding partnering with us to develop a degree program aimed at giving teachers the unique, practical knowledge and skills they need to become a top-flight principal at a JCPS school.”

APPLY NOW | Link for JCPS employees to submit Aspiring Leaders application information

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION OVERVIEW | All Spalding bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs 

WATCH THE PRESS CONFERENCE (STORY CONTINUES AFTER VIDEO)

The Aspiring Leaders program is open to JCPS employees with a Kentucky Teacher Certificate, at least three years of teaching experience and a bachelor’s or master’s degree with a 2.75 grade-point average. In addition to earning the master’s of education, completion of the program will lead to a Level I Kentucky Principal Certification and, depending on the individual’s previous education, either a Rank I or Rank II Kentucky Teacher Certification.

The Spalding program will be offered to JCPS employees at a tuition rate of $395 per credit hour, substantially lower than most other academic programs at the university. Spalding will work with JCPS on reviewing the applicant pool to select a cohort of the most promising aspiring principals.

The cohort model is designed to promote a learning environment in which diverse colleagues inspire and support each other while developing lasting professional relationships.

“As an urban education institution, Spalding is strongly committed to supporting Louisville’s diverse public school system,” Spalding President Tori Murden McClure said. “Through the Aspiring Leaders program, we are taking the next step in our support of JCPS by aligning our principal-preparation courses to be in lockstep with the values of the school district. We understand the unique strengths and unique challenges of Jefferson County schools, and we want to work with the district in ensuring that every school has a high-quality leader.”

Spalding Assistant Professor Dr. Glenn Baete, who retired last year as a JCPS assistant superintendent after previously serving as principal of Doss High School, will serve as program director for Aspiring Leaders.

Other instructors in the program include Dunn Elementary School Principal Dr. Tracy Barber and retired JCPS Assistant Superintendent Kirk Lattimore, who was a longtime principal at Crosby Middle School and recently served as acting principal at Manual High School. Many other JCPS leaders will come to Spalding to construct course experiences and give guest lectures on topics such as human resources, budgeting and curriculum instruction.

“You have individuals (teaching in the program) who have very strong backgrounds in a large, urban school district,” Baete said. “They are uniquely qualified from their personal experience to help these aspiring leaders develop the skills and understanding they need to succeed in JCPS schools. We will ensure that the classroom activities, the clinical experiences really align to the three pillars of JCPS. You’ll be experiencing JCPS first-hand in this program, and you’re going to see the people in Jefferson County who on a day-to-day basis help principals do their work.”

The Aspiring Leaders program consists of face-to-face, online and hybrid classes. (SEE A DETAILED PROGRAM CALENDAR HERE.) After meeting four times in July, students will attend one Wednesday evening class per week from August to April, one or two Saturday sessions per month from November to April, and four other weekday sessions during the 2020-21 academic year. (JCPS will provide substitute teachers to cover participants on the latter four days.)

Applications are being accepted through March 27 through the JCPS employee online hub or at this link. An informational session will take place 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 12 in the Stewart Auditorium of JCPS’ Van Hoose Education Center.  For more information, contact Dr. Baete at gbaete@spalding.edu .

College of Education Chair Dr. Chris Walsh said the Aspiring Leaders program is an example of Spalding answering a call from the state’s Education Professional Standards Board that requires colleges of education to partner more closely with their local school districts “to create programs and experiences that meet the needs of the times.”

“Our Aspiring Leaders’ partnership with JCPS is more than a graduate program for school leaders; it’s a rich opportunity for growth and personal transformation,” Spalding Dean of Graduate Education Dr. Kurt Jefferson said. “I’m thrilled that Spalding will be at the heart of these leaders’ intellectual and professional development in this exciting new master’s degree program.”

Mayor Greg Fischer and the Louisville Metro Police Department have called upon the community-building expertise of staff and faculty members at Spalding University to assist in a key initiative to improve relations between the police and residents in Louisville.

Chandra Irvin, Spalding’s Executive Director of Peace and Spiritual Renewal; Janelle Rae, Director of Inclusive Engagement; and Dr. Steven Kniffley, Assistant Professor in the School of Professional Psychology and the Associate Director of the Center for Behavioral Health; are members of the project management team of the city’s Synergy Project, a year-long program designed to bring police and residents together to discuss ways to strengthen their relationship. The Synergy Project is part of the city’s Lean Into Louisville initiative.

The public is invited to Spalding’s campus on Tuesday, Dec. 17 to learn about the Synergy Project and join the discussion. Spalding will host a public action session – a guided conversation in which residents can communicate and share ideas directly with police officers – from 6-7:30 p.m. at the College Street Ballroom, 812 S. Second St. It’s one of several action sessions that will take place around town in the coming year.

“When people talk about an issue that’s going on, they’ll say, ‘What can I do?’ (Participating in Tuesday’s action session) is definitely something you can do,” Irvin said.


Synergy Project Public Action Session
When: 6-7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 17
Where: College Street Ballroom, 812 S. Second Street

In the News | Courier Journal feature on the Synergy Project


Residents speak at a Synergy Project meeting on Spalding's campus
Mayor Greg Fischer, standing, and residents talked at a recent meeting for the Synergy Project that was held on Spalding’s campus. A public action session will take place 6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17, at Spalding’s College Street Ballroom.

The Synergy Project is intended to explore the tensions that exist between the significant societal values of public safety and individual rights and determine how to create and maintain a balance between the two, according to the city. Synergy will explore these tensions in order to mobilize actions for city-wide systemic change so every person in every part of the community can thrive.

The Synergy Project is modeled after The Illumination Project, an initiative undertaken in Charleston, South Carolina, after the 2015 hate crimes at Emanuel AME Church.

Irvin helped develop the Illumination Project, which also was a year-long program in which dozens of facilitated community conversations were held to discuss tensions between police and residents. At the end of the year, a strategic plan was unveiled, which continues to be revised and implemented today.

“There are lessons that we learned in Charleston that helped to inform how I am viewing and receiving feedback here,” Irvin said. “What I know is important is that we lean into the tension rather than leaning away from it. Really, that’s the only way that we’re going to connect in very genuine ways because clearly we don’t all have the same experiences and we don’t all think the same way.”

Irvin has helped the Synergy Project use a “polarity” framework that recognizes and values people’s different points of view.  It’s an approach that Irvin, Rae and others at Spalding have used to foster meaningful conversations on campus about a range of issues.

“We want to bring people together  despite differences – and actually invite differences – so that we can learn from one another and learn how to move to greater places with one another,” Irvin said.

The Synergy Project is bringing together individuals from all parts of the community – residents, academia, business, youth, faith-based organizations, law enforcement, and political leaders – in hopes of creating an opportunity for police and community to work together in a safe, open and respectful environment. The project hopes to identify root causes of distrust and find actionable solutions to move the city forward.

Irvin and Rae are helping to devise and carry out the programming and guided discussions of the Synergy Project. Kniffley, meanwhile, is researching and collecting data, along with Spalding Doctor of Clinical Psychology students Carson Haynes and Heather Dombrowsky.

Spalding's Chandra Irvin and Janelle Rae standing in front of a room of people seated around tables
Spalding staff members Irvin and Janelle Rae are part of the Synergy Project project management team. Psychology faculty Dr. Steven Kniffley is as well, working with grad students to collect and analyze data.

“This is a great example of a way to change the world,” Rae said of Spalding’s involvement. “Doing this work with the community and on behalf of community is in line with our Spalding mission. It’s our mission to embrace diverse people, and it’s our mission to create peace and promote social justice and to be of service in our communities. A big piece of this is learning from one another, learning about each other’s experiences so that we can actually be a connected community.

“I think it makes sense with our mission to train more and more people to engage productively with each other.”

Kniffley said that as a citizen of Louisville, he felt it was important to be a part of the Synergy Project.

“But then specifically as an African-American male,” he said, “just recognizing that there has always been tension between communities of color, specifically black communities, and law enforcement, to be a part of the effort that’s going to create a more meaningful relationship between the groups, I’m happy to be a part of that. Our goal is to use meaningful conversations that lead to actionable, tangible recommendations that the steering committee will then vote on and formulate into our final report.”

He added: “I think Spalding’s affiliation with the Synergy Project is consistent with our values of being a compassionate university, with being committed to issues of social justice and being at the forefront of change in the Louisville community.”

 

 

 

 

Spalding University’s enTECH center, Kosair Charities and the families of nine children enjoyed a happy holiday gathering on Wednesday during the second annual enTECH Day of Celebration. Gifts of assistive-technology devices and toys were distributed to the children, who range from 2 to 16 years old and who all face physical or cognitive challenges.

The gift distribution was made possible through the support of Kosair Charities. After enTECH therapist Alison Amschoff announced the recipients and explained how the children would benefit from the devices, Kosair Charities President Keith Inman and Board Chair Hugh I “H.” Stroth were on hand at enTECH to deliver the gifts.

The participating families applied for the devices through enTECH and its Kosair Charities Lending Library and Financial Assistance Program. The assistive-technology gifts, which included iPads and iPad accessories and various other switch toys, provide therapeutic, educational and sensory benefits and help with communication and play.

“I just want people to know that enTECH is a really significant part of this community for families who have kids with disabilities,” said Eric Wright, whose teenage daughters, Ella and Elsie, received an iPad and Apple Pencil on Wednesday. “Their advocacy and what they do for parents in the realm of therapy and the realm of assistive technology is truly amazing. I’ve been blessed to be able to have this for my family. We love the therapists we’ve worked with, particularly Alison, who we’ve known since Ella (who’s now 16) was 2 years old.”

LEARN MORE ABOUT enTECH, THE SERVICES IT OFFERS AND ITS STAFF

Wright said assistive-technology devices like the ones that were distributed on Wednesday can be expensive for families to purchase and may be difficult or impossible to acquire through insurance.

He said Ella’s old iPad, which she relies on to communicate because she is nonverbal, constantly freezes up but that it was unlikely the family would have replaced it anytime soon.

“To have Kosair Charities partner up with Spalding and enTECH to make this gift happen is really amazing,” he said. “This makes a big difference for us, particularly as we move into the new year.”

The Kosair Charities Enabling Technologies of Kentuckiana (or enTECH) assistive technology resource center is a division of the Spalding University Auerbach School of Occupational Therapy. EnTECH is one of five state-designated assistive technology resource centers in Kentucky. Its mission is to create assistive technology solutions to meet the needs of the times through the enhancement of all people’s participation in everyday life activities. Its Lending Library provides families or individuals the opportunity to rent or be loaned pieces of assistive technology.

Spalding, Kosair Charities and enTECH officials posed families at enTECH
Officials from Spalding, Kosair Charities and enTECH gathered with the families who received gifts at the enTECH Day of Celebration, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019.